Special Issue

Thank you “Quality Control of India” and special thanks to you sir and your team for organising awareness program of NABH accreditation for CGHS on July 9, 2009 in Mumbai. Being a part of this event was quite a learning experience. The most interesting session being that elaborating necessity of accreditation of healthcare providers to better serve patients, be it national or international. The board being intuitively active towards setting a benchmark for quality healthcare throughout the country, NABH undoubtedly has evolved as a driving force directing the public and private healthcare system of India to realise its global stand in a short span of time.

D Y Dave, Ahmedabad

 
The cover story ‘Measuring quality of public services’ (May 2009) was interesting to read. The story threw some very poignant facts about the governance in India. India as a matter of fact has become synonymous with bad governance over a period of time. The basic principles of good governance have been ignored by the government of India. Otherwise, India would not have been fared so low in Worldwide Governance Indicators 2008 Transparency International. The government should take stringent measures to bring transparency and accountability in governance. Transparency and accountability can only ensure good governance in India and positive change in the system.
Ram Singh, New Delhi
 
 
 
 
 

  


COVER STORY
The road ahead  
Exclusive and in-depth interviews with the Union Minister for Commerce and Industry Anand Sharma, Union Minister for Human Resource Development Kapil Sibal and Minister of State for Road Transport and Highways R P N Singh.
Movement
Lead poisoning continues to affect everyone and most of it takes place due to the high levels of lead in domestic paints. There is indeed a way out of the serious problem. All that has to be done is to take timely action.
Focus  
Pure blood is a key driver to good quality and the importance of blood safety cannot be underemphasised, says Lead Surveyor for ISQua's accreditation programmes, Dr B K Rana, Deputy Director, National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH), QCI.
Special Report  
The shortage and availability of drinking water affects the quality of our lives. The government has taken the initiative to provide quality potable water to the people through a number of measures. A report.
Education
The Conference on ‘Sharing Best Practices in Education’ saw diverse opinions on disparate issues relating to education, but there was consensus on the need to reform the education system. An in-depth report.
 
QCI News
A review of the activities — national and international — of the Quality Council of India.
 

The regulatory authorities in India are still in its nascent stage as illustrated in the story ‘Need to regulate the regulators’ (May 2009). I totally agree with the finding, preciously for the reason
that over the period of time, these regulatory authorities has reduced to ‘toothless tigers’ by the government. Their style of working has been marred by babudom. On the contrary, these regulatory bodies wield more power as they regulate other government as well as private bodies. For their efficient working, the government needs to put in place a proper mechanism through which these regulatory bodies can be controlled.

Akash Sehgal, Surat

 
‘Yes. We can.’ (May 2009) story came out hard on the dismal state of education in India. Education in India has been worst hit sector since independence. As a matter of fact, Education was on the top-most priority list after independence and was seen largely as a highly growth sector. After 60 years of independence,
education in India still remains a distant dream. Here, poor come to schools not for education but for free food, clothes and money. Though some states like Himachal Pradesh and Kerala has shown remarkable growth in Education, but other than these states, other states are still struggling. Poonam Goel, Gwalior.
Ram Singh, New Delhi
Quality Council of India
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